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Last Saturday, 13 June saw the official opening of the Museum & Gallery’s newest exhibition,
Hurstville: Past & Present. We were joined by around 50 guests, who loved our display of ‘now and then’ images. Many guests remarked on how emotional it was to see how much had changed in Hurstville and to take a trip down memory lane.

postcards past and present

Many memories and stories were shared on our postcard wall. Here are a few:

I remember standing in Diment Way during the war years waiting for 2 hours to buy a bottle of sherry for our Christmas cake and pudding…

I went to Hurstville public school in the early 1960s… folk dancing in the playground! Tom was the bus driver of the old 112 bus

It was great to see old and new photos of my old primary school – it looks just the same!

Want another sneak peak at some of our feature images?

Corner of Forest Road and Treacy Street

Combined image, corner of Forest Road and Treacy Street, Hurstville,  1926 and 2015. Images courtesy of Hurstville City Library Museum & Gallery collection
Combined image, corner of Forest Road and Treacy Street, Hurstville, c. 1926 and 2015. Image courtesy of Hurstville City Library Museum & Gallery collection

The Strand Theatre was the first grand theatre of its type to be built in Hurstville. It contained a wide marble staircase, tiered seating, a sunken orchestra pit and the latest tip-up theatre seats. When pictures were not showing, The Strand transformed into a dance hall and a roller skating rink.

The Theatre’s location so close to the railway tracks presented some interesting sound effects. Hurstville resident Beryl Godfrey remembers that romantic scenes would be interrupted by the ‘hissing and banging’ of the steam train taking up water. Thus, with the introduction of talking movies, or ‘talkies’, The Strand could not maintain its audience.

Corner of Forest Road and Diment Way

Combined image, corner of Forest Road and Diment Way, Hurstville, c.1930 and 2015. Image courtesy of Hurstville City Library Museum & Gallery collection
Combined image, corner of Forest Road and Diment Way, Hurstville, c.1930 and 2015.
Image courtesy of Hurstville City Library Museum & Gallery collection

Diments Store opened on Forest Road in 1918 across from the railway station. It was a mixed business that sold a huge variety of things essential to life in a semi-rural town. During the war, it relied mainly on female staff. Retail was one of the only industries where women were paid an equal wage to men. Dorothy Diment recalls having to float between departments, an especially difficult task given the disparate array of stock. One day, she found herself having to sell explosives to a customer. She started to place ten detonators onto the counter, one at a time, until the customer exclaimed ‘don’t do that, or you’ll blow bloody Hurstville right off the map!’

Visit our ‘what’s on’ page at the LMG website for more information on the exhibition and to hear about our upcoming Past & Present events and activities!

 

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